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What Questions Not to Ask Entry-Level Employees

Finding entry-level jobs is seemingly the most daunting activity for a fresh graduate. Armed with a degree, mostly theoretical knowledge and measured practical experience that in most real-life situations count for nothing. More to fret about if you took a gap year or more to explore other interests, now you feel like fish in fresh waters who's lingered in the shallow end for far too long. All the more reason to dive in the deep, dark and frightful waters quickly but you're unaware.

Hard as it is for an entry-level job seeker with little to no experience to find the right fit, it can also be quite tricky dealing with the challenge of hiring for such positions for your company. How do you find raw talent that is meticulous, proactive and quickly inducible? 

Short-Term Goals

You’re tasked with the odiousness of carefully, and with a sixth sense sifting through dozens of people to find talent, dedication, and teachability within the shortest time frame. You’d be focused on finding someone whose interest aligns with the company's value long term, but you'd not find that out by asking them where they see themselves in a specific timeframe. That answer will be an accomplishment in giving the best solution suited for the hiring personnel's ears and unrevealing at best. You'd be better of asking about short-term goals and ideas on achieving them to get a more precise sense of the candidate's interests.

Leadership Roles

You do not want to ask about leadership roles in past positions as there have mostly been none and minimal opportunity for such tasks, it'll be better to create a hands-on activity to test available skills. Ask their greatest strengths and pay close attention to them spill their guts, between the lines, you'll find weaknesses neatly cushioned as strengths. An entry level graduate with no experience is mostly scrambling at job interviews, as there's been little to no experience on how to handle the most basic corporate challenge.

They have been up-all-night shopping the best answers to frequently asked questions. You want to catch them unguarded with questions that'll make them think within the confines of the job description and their education. 

Generic questions like;

  • Why you should I hire you?
  • How do you handle stress and pressure?
  • How would you describe yourself?
  • How will a close teacher, supervisor or friend describe you?
  • What career achievement are you most proud of?

will barely help you scratch the surface to discover the inner workings, talent, and employability of a fresh graduate with no experience.